Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Muslim preacher sentenced to 11 years in jail for blasphemy for burning a Bible (June 16, 2013)


(Reuters) - A Cairo court sentenced an Egyptian Muslim preacher to 11 years in jail for blasphemy on Sunday for burning a Bible during a protest last year outside the U.S. embassy.
 
See the following link for the full article:
 
 
 
Grace and peace,
 
David

5 comments:

Rory said...

Hey Dave,

Do you know anything about the laws in Egypt? Maybe all religions are protected against public demonstrations of disdain? Anyway, it is an interesting contrast from the United States where the law is more concerned to protect public demonstrations of disdain.

ali khan said...

Thats justice ! , thanks to the court of Egypt for doing that .

Burning of Bible is burning of word of God which God has given to Moses , David , other prophets and Jesus , Quran is a testimony to this .

Muslims , Christians and Jews are so near yet soo far . God guide them all and fill their hearts with mercy , respect and love towards each other .

David Waltz said...

Hi Rory,

Yesterday, you asked:

==Do you know anything about the laws in Egypt?==

Me: Alas, I do not.

==Maybe all religions are protected against public demonstrations of disdain?==

Me: From what I understand about the jizya tax levied on 'people of the book' within Muslim controlled countries/lands, it is basically for protection, because only Muslims can serve in the military. You may ask what this has to do with your question—it seems to me that if 'people of the book' are under protection within the Islamic state they reside, that this protection would extend would extend to their sacred books/writings.

==Anyway, it is an interesting contrast from the United States where the law is more concerned to protect public demonstrations of disdain.==

Me: Good point. My turn for a question: which example do you think better represents the Biblical view?


Grace and peace,

David

David Waltz said...

Hi Ali,

Thanks much for the charitable comments. Not only was 'justice' served, but also respect and honor was upheld.


Grace and peace,

David

Rory said...

Dave,

I don't think "freedom of speech" as understood in modern times by western democracy can be derived from anybody's Scripture. I am comfortable with state suppression of anti-religious words and actions.

I am confident that except for religious "conservatives" who try to fuse the Bible with the American and French revolutions, most who believe in freedom of speech, would agree with me, that Scripture study isn't how they came to believe in the right to publish pornography and blasphemy.

All that to say, I have an ideological preference what the Egyptian model appears to be.

Rory